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Flying-V made its Maiden Flight Successfully

Issue 6 - 2020
Flying-V made its Maiden Flight Successfully

The Flying-V made its maiden flight sucessfully at an airbase in Germany. After a period of extensive wind tunnel testing and a series of ground tests in the Netherlands, researchers, engineers and a drone pilot from TU Delft were ready to see the Flying-V’s first flight and obtain an impression of the flight characteristics.

Project leader Dr Roelof Vos and his team of researchers and engineers took the 22.5 kg and 3 m wide scale model of the Flying-V for flight tests to a well-guarded airbase in Germany, where they could work together with a team from Airbus. The pilot’s task was to take-off, fly a number of test manoeuvres and approaches until the batteries were nearly empty and then land. And he succeeded. Vos: “One of our worries was that the aircraft might have some difficulty lifting-off, since previous calculations had shown that ‘rotation’ could be an issue. The team optimized the scaled flight model to prevent the issue but the proof of the pudding is in the eating. You need to fly to know for sure.” Rotation on take-off was performed easily and occurred at a speed of 80 km/h. The plane’s thrust was good and flight speeds and angles were as predicted.

But testing new technology is never straightforward. The team had a challenging week in which they had to change the center of gravity of the aircraft and fix the antenna to improve telemetry. The flight has now also confirmed that the current design still shows too much ‘Dutch roll’, causing a slightly rough landing. The next step for the team is to use the data collected during the flight for an aerodynamic (software) model of the aircraft. This will make it possible to program it in a flight simulator to be used in future research, while further improving the flight characteristics. The team will also prepare the scale model for future flight tests.

The Flying-V

The Flying-V is a design for a highly energy-efficient long-distance aeroplane. The aircraft’s design integrates the passenger cabin, the cargo hold and the fuel tanks in the wings, creating a spectacular V-shape. Computer calculations have predicted that the aircraft’s improved aerodynamic shape and reduced weight will reduce fuel consumption by 20% compared to today’s most advanced aircraft. KLM has been a partner in the project since 2019. Also due to their support, the project team has been able to build this scale model. It was first presented at the 100th anniversary of KLM in October 2019. Various business partners are now involved in the project, including Airbus. Airbus is also an explicit supporter for the first flight. The partners are working together on a research plan to fine-tune the concept. Next step: providing the Flying-V with sustainable propulsion, taking into account that the design seems highly suitable to carry liquid hydrogen instead of kerosene.

 


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